Update for 4/4/2020

Grace and peace in our Lord, Jesus Christ! I hope all of you are well, staying at home, washing your hands, and generally staying healthy.

Tomorrow represents the traditional start of Holy Week — the week in which we remember Christ’s time in Jerusalem, his arrest, trial, conviction, and death leading to the great celebration of Easter on April 12. Tomorrow’s online worship experience begins with Christ’s triumphal entry into the city (the liturgy of the palms), and moves to his arrest and trial before Pilate (the liturgy of the passion). The video for this experience is already up on YouTube and I hope you will take the time to watch the full video (go to https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=68fE_A9phqQ&t=109s to see it).

This Friday we will be putting out a devotional experience for Good Friday focused on Jesus’s “seven last words” on the cross. This will be a simple reflection on Christ’s death and it’s meaning for our lives. I will let you know when it’s up.

Of course, we still will not be together in person on Easter Sunday given the requirements to stay at home. While some churches are attempting “drive-in” worship on that day, our leadership team decided that we would be better served by celebrating Easter whenever we are able to meet together again in person, and so our first worship service after this is all over will be a celebration of new life in the resurrection of Jesus Christ our Lord. We will, however, be remembering Christ’s resurrection in our video worship on April 12.

One thing that’s lacking in the video worship experience is the interaction with one another about how God is present in our midst. I want to invite any of you who is willing to make comments on the YouTube or church web page about what God is saying to you in the service. I also want to invite any of you to record a video on your smartphone or computer with a prayer request, a witness, or a testimony and email it to me and I will try to include it in the service. For our Easter video, would you think about recording your or your family saying “Christ is risen! Christ is risen indeed!” and emailing the video to me at jvoorhees@cityroadchapel.org. It would be great to include as many of you as possible in that service.

In other news, we will again be hosting the Showers of Blessing ministry this Monday, using volunteers from Community Care Fellowship and City Road Chapel. We will also be giving out snack bags to our homeless friends assembled by our friends at Matthews Memorial UMC.

I also want to offer a personal word of thanks to Diane Iovino and Jimmie Douglas (along with Amy Campbell, our banker at Pinnacle) for their work in getting together the application for financial support available to us through the CARE program approved by Congress to assist small businesses. This will allow us to continue to provide salary support to our daycare and other staff, and should we be approved for these funds, it will be a great gift. Jimmie and Diane have taken great leadership in guiding us through this process and I can not thank them enough.

I continue to hold each of you in my prayers. I ask for a special measure of God’s grace to be upon you in the days and weeks ahead.

Jay

Online Connection and Prayer Time

God is good!

Happy Tuesday. It’s a rainy day here in Old Hickory, but also a good day for a grand experiment.

Today at 2 p.m. I will be hosting on online gathering via Google Meet. I will lead us in a short devotion, and it will be a time to check-in, share prayer requests, and pray together.
If you have a computer with a webcam, click on meet.google.com/cbx-adtm-zsu and it will take you to our meeting. If you have a smartphone, download the Google Meet app and point it to the meeting ID: meet.google.com/cbx-adtm-zsu
If you are computer challenged, you can participate via the phone by calling (252) 427-1307‬ and entering the PIN when prompted: PIN: ‪566 936 127#‬
This is a grand experiment in connecting in a new way, and I hope you will join me for a time of reflection and prayer.

 

An Update for 3/26/2020

Thursday, March 26, 2020

Greetings in the name of our Lord, Jesus Christ!

As I hope you know, we are doing everything possible to stay connected during this time when we’re being asked to stay at home. Since we were asked to stop having services on March 14, we have used all sorts of mediums to try and stay connected:

  • Email
  • Our Facebook page and group
  • SMS Phone Text Messaging
  • YouTube (with our weekly worship services).
  • Our One Call Tell All phone messaging service.
  • Our church website
  • Our podcast

Knowing that some in our church are without electronic communication we are also working on trying to put together a print newsletter of some sort as we are able.

Trust me, trying to connect via all these means can be exhausting, but I’m committed to reaching as many people as possible with news about our church and the message of God’s love.

There is no way to know how long we will be asked to forgo face-to-face gatherings and it’s very likely that we won’t be together for Palm Sunday, and maybe even Easter. I have given thought to Easter Sunday worship in the parking lot in our cars and will be talking with some of our leaders about that this week.

I want to thank all who have taken the plunge to give online this week, as well as those who have sent checks to support our work. If you haven’t given online and want to see what it’s all about, check out the YouTube video at https://youtu.be/8SxpwIFWWRU

One of the benefits of being a Google subscriber for our email accounts is that we have access to an excellent online conferencing app. Google Meet lets folks connect via phone webcam videos and telephone for group conferences (Zoom and WebEx are competitors). If you would like to set up a conference for your group, please let me know and we will schedule it for you. You do not have to be a Google subscriber to use the service.

Per the request of Governor Lee, our Child Development Center continues to be open as an emergency provider for families of essential workers. We are taking extra precautions to limit the infection risk and are pleased that we can offer this service to our neighbors.

When we heard the news about bar and restaurant closings several weeks ago, we realized that there would be workers struggling after losing their jobs. We set up a special Bar and Restaurant Workers Fund and have been collecting money from folks throughout the area to provide assistance (currently, in the form of a $75 prepaid Visa card). If you want to support folks who live and work in the area, please visit www.cityroadchapel.org/brwf. This effort got some national news coverage which you can read at https://religionnews.com/2020/03/19/houses-of-worship-pitch-in-to-help-those-left-vulnerable-by-virus-outbreak/?fbclid=IwAR3-mV2wXNbw6slHyZV7rVrNoCGSSQ4WNofYRkV3riZLWfvfxVMU1b7jbjA

Of course, don’t miss our next online worship service, which will go live on YouTube at Midnight on Saturday morning. You can find links to all the videos at https://cityroadchapel.org/videos

Last, but not least, I hope by now that most of you have received a phone call from one of our members checking up on you and getting some information about how you are staying connected to the church. I’m most thankful for their help, and I need your help as well in keeping up with what is going on in your lives. Please email me (pastor@cityroadchapel.org) or call me at 615-310-6530 if you have news you would like to share, or just need a listening ear.

I miss all of you and can’t wait until that day when we can be back together in person again!

With Christ’s love,
Pastor Jay

Worship for March 15, 2020

Due to the COVID-19 outbreak, the City Road Chapel UMC has suspended on-site worship services for March 15 and 22, 2020. This video devotion was created to help our faith community connect and experience something of worship together.

On March 22, it is our intention to live-stream a worship experience from our sanctuary at 10 a.m.. All videos can be found at cityroadchapel.org/videos.

While we are not gathering on Sundays, we WILL continue to do ministry here at City Road Chapel. As such, we continue to need your donations to help support our work here. You are invited to donate at cityroadchapel.org/give.

If you have a pastoral need, please reach out to our pastor, Jay Voorhees, at 615-868-1673 or at jvoorhees@cityroadchapel.org

A Word from the Pastor on COVID-19 and Worship

Dear friends,

As you know, we have been monitoring the COVID-19 outbreak throughout our nation and community closely. We have developed our own protocols to minimize risk throughout the church, but of course, we can never fully eradicate that risk. We have watched other congregations and annual conferences choose to cancel all meetings and worship to promote social distancing.

Today at approximately 3:30 p.m. we received notice from Bishop William McAlilly that he is asking congregations in the Tennessee Annual Conference to cancel all worship services and group activities for at least the next two weeks. As such we will not have Sunday morning services at City Road Chapel this Sunday (March 15, 2020) and most likely the following Sunday as well. 

Of course, there are some who may believe this is an overreaction. All I can say is that the Centers for Disease Control has recommended that persons who are of high risk avoid gatherings of 10 persons or larger. “High risk” includes folks over 60, people on blood thinners, people with chronic liver or kidney disease, folks with compromised immune systems, diabetics, heart disease, lung diseases, and those with neurological disorders. That is, unfortunately, a large number of us at City Road Chapel.

As we figure out this different pathway, here are some things for you to keep in mind:

  • While we will not have worship at the Gallatin Pike location, we WILL be providing a worship experience at 10 a.m. online, through either our church website (cityroadchapel.org) or our Facebook page (facebook.com/cityroadchapel/).
    Please consider joining with your brothers and sisters at this time as we pray, sing, and consider God’s Word.
  • Even though we will not have church services, the expenses will continue at City Road Chapel, so it is important that you continue to offer your financial gifts. You can, of course, mail your check to the church at 701 Gallatin Pike S., Madison, TN 37115, but we strongly encourage you to consider giving electronically by visiting cityroadchapel.org/give. ALL gifts are accounted for and included in your statement of giving.
  • The church offices will be open during the week if you have a need. This may change based on the recommendations of the health department, but for the time being, we will still be open for business.
  • The Child Development Center (CDC) is following the lead of the Department of Human Services and the Metro Health Department. The CDC has protocols in place to limit infection and children appear to not get especially sick through this virus. However, we WILL close if required to do so. Be watching for more information on this.
  • Class gatherings will meet at the discretion of the teacher and the group. If your class would like to meet, you might consider hosting a Zoom meeting (zoom.us) for an online gathering.

This is an unprecedented situation, and trust me that we never covered this in seminary! We’re all trying to figure out how to respond to keep people safe . . . and that is a part of calling as United Methodists. Bishop McAlilly said it well: “Our Wesleyan roots have always included the concern for those most vulnerable. The people called Methodist established some of the first hospitals in this country. Now is an especially important time to live out our calling to love one another and to take care of those around us.”

May God’s grace and peace be with you as we spend this time in the wilderness.

With Christ’s love,

Jay Voorhees
Sr. Pastor

Responding to the COVID-19 Outbreak

As news reports continue regarding the spread of the Coronavirus known as COVID-19 through the U.S., leaders in our church have been thinking about the best means of preventing the virus from spreading in our facility and through our worship services and events. Our staff and leadership team is dedicated to preserving our congregations’ well-being and safety by taking every precaution to keep all our church family healthy, especially those over 60 years of age and those with underlying medical conditions and immuno-compromised.

Therefore, we are proactively developing our plans and following what the Tennessee Department of Health is recommending as they monitor the spread of COVID-19 virus. At this time, the risk level in Tennessee is still low. As one leading doctor of infectious medicine said it’s not a time to panic, but rather a time to prepare. So, we are preparing. As such, we will be putting the following protocols into place to limit the spread of this virus (which also has the added benefit of reducing the spread of ANY infection).

Personal Practices

According to health professionals, the most important response to limit the spread of COVID-19 is through our own personal practices. Here are some guidelines to help you both at church and in the broader community:

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for 20 seconds.
    Use proper handwashing techniques. No soap and water? use 60%+ alcohol hand sanitizer.  And you must rub your hands with sanitizer vigorously until it is completely dry effective. (20 seconds is about the time it takes to sing the Doxology!)
  • Stay home if you are sick!!!! If you are feeling unwell, please rest at home.
    You have permission to miss worship. We are working on making provisions to stream our services on the Internet and be watching for more information on how you can watch from home.
  • When coughing or sneezing, consider others and keep covered.
    Sneezing or coughing into a tissue (and dispose of immediately), or an elbow not hands.
  • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth.
    Hands are the greatest way we spread infection.
  • Maintain social distancing.
    Keep 3 feet between yourself and anyone who is sneezing and coughing. Limit direct contact as much as possible including greeting. Elbow and fist bumps are better but not the best. Some are suggesting that the Japanese practice of the bow would be appropriate.

Worship Practices

Worship services are the most important gatherings of our church, but unfortunately are also a means by which infections can spread. To minimize the spread of disease we are making the following changes:

  • Greeters and Ushers
    • Greeters are encouraged to welcome folks without shaking hands or offering hugs as a means of limiting contact. A warm smile and a friendly word probably means more anyway.
    • Greeters are also asked to open the doors for folks to avoid too many hands making contact with the door handles. Our staff will be regularly disinfecting the doors, but limiting contact is helpful.
    • Our ushers will continue to take the offering, but we will not pass the plates from person to person. The ushers will sanitize the plates before the collection and will wear gloves to receive the offering. There will also be a basket near the front of the sanctuary for donations and attendance cards. We are strongly encouraging all who are able to consider on-line giving at www.cityroadchapel.org/give. You can setup up an automatic, recurring donation at that website as well.
    • We will no longer be using the shared “pew pads” to keep up with attendance and for visitors to provide information. We will be creating pew cards for folks to complete and place in the collection basket each week.
  • Communion
    • Communion Stewards will be asked to prepare all the elements for communion in the church kitchen using rubber gloves. Prior to preparing the meal, ALL trays and utensils will be sanitized in our commercial dishwasher.
    • Communion servers will use alcohol-based hand sanitizer immediately prior to serving communion and will wear gloves throughout the communion service.
    • The bread will be served by the servers using our sanitized tongs. Recipients should approach the server with their hands cupped to receive the elements so as to avoid contact with the tongs. Since the servers will have just disinfected their hands and are wearing gloves, they will hand the cups to the person receiving rather than having many hands touching the cups.
    • We will serve communion at two stations located at the side aisles with all standing to receive the elements. All are welcome to kneel at the altar for prayer after receiving, but those concerned with infection risks should feel free to return to their seats via the center aisle.
  • Prayer Time
    • In order to prevent the spread of germs, we will be discontinuing the practice of inviting people to pray with the pastor at the altar rail.

Other Practices

  • We will be sanitizing door handles, elevator buttons, and the access keypads on a daily basis. Folks may want to bring their own disinfectant wipes to wipe down these surfaces before touching them.
  • We will be providing hand sanitizer (as available) at the coffee station and we encourage all to wash their hands before getting their coffee.
  • All persons handling donations and information cards will be encouraged to use rubber gloves in their work.
  • We will be disinfecting our listening aid devices weekly.
  • We will start “livestreaming” our 10 a.m. service on the Internet at the earliest convenience so that persons who are sick or need to avoid crowds will have the opportunity to access our services. If you need help in thinking through how to access these service, please talk to Pastor Jay,

Preparation is not worry…

“Give your entire attention to what God is doing right now, and don’t get worked up about what may or may not happen tomorrow. God will help you deal with whatever hard things come up when the time comes.

–Matthew 6:34 (The Message)

 

Pastor’s Blog — What’s happening in the UMC

It’s very likely that you will be seeing some news articles in the coming days saying that the United Methodist Church is about to split. My friend Sky McCracken, the pastor at First Methodist Downtown in Jackson, TN, recently posted about this and I can’t it better than he, so here I’m sharing his words.

To First Methodist Downtown Jackson, and other United Methodist folks:

Our news media and social media will soon be blowing up about our denomination being “expected to split” over gay marriage (sound familiar?). The latest will be around this document that was released today (I’ll post the link on the first reply below).

Keep in mind while this is an important document and signed by many influential people in our denomination:

  • Half of the signatories are from bishops, who have **no** vote or voice at General Conference.
  • Other signatories on the document REPRESENT various caucus and interest groups in the UMC, but their groups may or may not be in total agreement with their leadership. It’s been my experience that few, if any, of these groups are monolithic in belief or sentiment.
  • This document may – or may not – be legal according to our Judicial Council.

This is not the first document to gain recent media attention; a few months ago the Indianapolis Plan was released, with a similar goal in mind.

Yogi Berra’s advice may be helpful here:
1. It ain’t over until it’s over.
2. When you get to a fork in the road, take it.

I have intentionally not made a particularly big deal about United Methodist political stuff in the wake of the St. Louis General Conference last year because I believe that there isn’t any value in worrying about “what if’s” until something firm is in place. I also believe that we have enough work to do in making City Road Chapel a place that welcomes all people, inviting them into a relationship with the one who created us. So, while this is an important development, it honestly makes little difference in our day-to-day lives at this point in time. Yes, I believe that it is very likely that there may be a split in our denomination, but until we know more about what that looks like I am placing it in God’s hands for God to work out.

I’ll post some links to articles and the documents below.

Love y’all,
Jay

It’s All About Relationships

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.
–John 1:1

One of the unique characteristics of our Christian tradition is our belief in one God in three persons — Father, Son, and Spirit. The “Trinity” (as we call it) recognizes that Jesus was not only the Son of God but that Jesus was, in fact, the same God that created all the world, and that the Holy Spirit is likewise one and the same as the Father and Son. Honestly, the Trinity is a mystery that can boggle the mind at times, and while there are all sorts of ways of trying to explain it, it is something that we ultimately have to recognize as unexplainable and something that we affirm through faith.

For me, the central truth of the Trinity is that we believe in a God who at the very core is relational. Our belief in the Trinity should (if we really reflect on it) should help us see that Christianity is never something that is individual but rather always about relationship. John Wesley, the founder of Methodism, understood that an individualistic approach to faith was dangerous to the church and God’s Kingdom. He wrote, “I shall endeavor to show that Christianity is essentially a social religion and that to turn it into a solitary religion is indeed to destroy it.” He would later say that “Holy solitaries” is a phrase that no more consistent with the gospel than holy adulterers. The gospel of Christ knows of no religion but social; no holiness but social holiness.”

We live in a time when there is a great focus on individualism — both in the secular world and in the church. We talk about Jesus as our “personal” savior and folks will talk about how they don’t need the church because it’s all about “me and Jesus.” But to make the message of Jesus about personal fulfillment without being part of a relationship is to miss out on the relational God who created us for connection.

A friend of mine recently told her story of coming back into the church after being outside for a while. She had developed a friendship with a Presbyterian pastor who didn’t hit her over the head with a bible or tell her how sinful she was, but rather simply loved on her. At one point she looked at him and told him that she was “spiritual, but not religious…” (a phrase I often hear among younger folks these days). He looked back at her and said “That’s like saying I play football, but not on a team.”

During the month of October, we’re going to think about what it means to believe in a God who is relational, and how we are called to be in relationship to that God, to one another in the church, and to the world. I really believe that Christianity is a religion that is all about relationships. Our calling as Methodist people is to proclaim a faith that absolutely believes that we are interconnected to one another, that we called to seek after God in community, and that the church is a place where Christ can be seen and experienced in a very real way, for the church IS the Body of Christ.

For sure, we are broken humans who often disagree — but in a world so polarized as what we experience today we have an even greater responsibility to model that we are still one body, even in the face of our disagreement. What is more important than our right belief (orthodoxy) is making sure that we maintain right relationships with God, with one another, and the world.

I hope you will join me this Sunday morning at 8 or 10 a.m. as we think together about what it means to follow a relational God.

–Jay

Blessed are the poor, the hungry, and the weeping

This morning, the scripture focus in my devotional time was from Luke 6. In particular, verses 20-21 jumped out at me:

Then [Jesus] looked up at his disciples and said:

“Blessed are you who are poor,
for yours is the kingdom of God.
“Blessed are you who are hungry now,
for you will be filled.
“Blessed are you who weep now,
for you will laugh.

Lukes version of these “beatitudes” (blessings) differs a bit from Matthew’s in the Sermon on the Mount, and Luke is careful to not overly spiritualize them. Given Luke’s focus on the poor and marginalized, it’s likely that he is talking about folks living in poverty, those who are hungry, and those consumed with grief. In Luke’s vision of God’s kingdom, there is a special relationship between God and those on the margins and there is always a word of hope for folks for whom life is a struggle (as well as a word of warning for those whose riches are built on the backs of the poor).

However, in my reading this morning, I found myself reading these verses in the context of our church, specifically the City Road Chapel congregation to which I’ve been sent to lead. As all of you know, City Road is a place that experienced great success in the past, but in recent years has struggled as the community and the world changed. While compared to some places we are a place of great riches, our current reality is that doing ministry in our context is hard and that we have challenges in maintaining that which God has given us. We have the riches of a wonderful facility, but as our Bishop likes to say, “…we are building poor…” in that the facility is larger than what we need and expensive to maintain. We have dedicated members committed to ministry in Madison, but it’s been hard to bring a new generation of folks to join us in the journey of becoming disciples of Jesus Christ. There are even times when we are brought to tears over the loss of what we were are we are heading toward an uncertain future.

And yet, as I read Jesus’ blessings this morning, maybe that place of poverty, hunger, and weeping is just where we need to be faithful disciples of Jesus Christ. You see, Jesus says clearly that it’s when we are poor we fully experience the riches of God’s Kingdom, when we are hungry that we begin to find satisfaction with the most basic things, and when we are weeping that we will be moved to joy and laughter.

I think this raises some important questions for our church:

  • How are we poor?
  • What do we hunger for?
  • What in the world is bringing us to tears?

We all will likely have different answers to these questions. None of them are right or wrong, but they are still important to think about as we pursue the goal of proclaiming and bringing forth Gos’ Kingdom here on earth.

The first question can be the most difficult in some ways because it’s easy to find ourselves with a list of things we are missing or ways that we fall short of our desires. Yet, one of the interesting things about folks who seem to thrive in the midst of poverty is their ability to see beyond what they don’t have and instead focus on the blessings that they do! We begin to experience the amazing bounty of the Kingdom of God when we are able to recognize the smallest of blessings as signs of God’s blessing and providence. These are lives of gratitude, thanking God that we are alive and seeing the smallest things as great gifts. To be “poor” and know the Kingdom of God is to live lives focused on abundance rather than scarcity.

The second question, how are we hungry, is important to think about as we consider what we do together as a church. For far too many years we have been churches focused on “programs” rather than understanding ourselves as a place called to feed the hungry – both physically and spiritually. Addressing spiritual hunger is absolutely as important as addressing true hunger, for it is the spiritual hunger that we carry with us throughout our lives whether our stomachs are growling or not. Many of us in the church rarely (if ever) miss a meal but give short shrift to thinking about and addressing our spiritual hunger. How are you hungry and are you taking any efforts to get fed, or are you simply sitting outside the gate grumbling at how hungry you are.

Finally, what are we weeping about? What are the things in our community that are bringing us to tears?

In my own life, there are many things that I see today that break my heart:

  • Those who are unable to believe in a loving God due to a church that has been judgmental and exclusive.
  • A community in which there is not a supply of housing for those living in poverty, and the tendency to blame these persons for their plight rather than finding a way to help them in their need.
  • A society that is deeply polarized with little conversation across political and theological lines, and a lack of respect for those who differ with us.
  • The proliferation of payday lenders in our immediate neighborhood which make a financial profit on the backs of those who are struggling financially.
  • The loss of a generation of youth to poverty, drugs, and violence through our inability to speak to them and address their needs.
  • The inability of the church to be a community of love and acceptance to all people.

I’m sure you have your own list, and I hope you will share it in the comments below. I simply hope and pray that there are things in the world that are bringing you to tears, things that make you hungry for finding a solution that is worthy of the one who created and loves us.

Blessed are the poor, the hungry, and the weeping.

May we be those people together.

Thinking about the Harvest

Yesterday we finished up our series on the Fruit of the Spirit. We finished by looking at the last fruit — self control, but then I tried to wrap up the series talking about harvesting. I’m not sure I really did that justice, so here are some thoughts about the harvest when you have some time to listen to them. Feel free to let me know your thoughts.

What does/will the harvest look like at City Road Chapel?

What are we doing to help fruit grow so that the harvest can begin?